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The newborn is not breathing - step by step resuscitation of the newborn

The newborn is not breathing - step by step resuscitation of the newborn



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There is probably no more terrifying situation for parents than when a child suddenly stops responding to stimuli and is not breathing. It is direct life threatening condition, that's why at this point the most important thing is to master take immediate action and promptly call for help. Of course, we hope that none of our readers will ever be put in such a difficult situation as newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation, However, we believe that every adult (and often also children) should know the rules in this case and be able to apply them correctly. Therefore, we encourage you to thoroughly familiarize yourself with the following guidelines for providing first aid in a newborn child with cardiac arrest, so that in case of such an need to act efficiently and effectively in the fight for the baby's life.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a nutshell, i.e. the most important information about CPR

At the beginning we want to introduce in a few words, what exactly is CPR. By definition it is a set of rescue actions applied to the victim with suspected sudden cardiac arrest. It is manifested by cardiac arrest (no palpable pulse), apnea (no audible and palpable breath) and loss of consciousness. Resuscitation is designed to maintain blood flow through the heart muscle and brain and to restore cardiovascular function. Additional restoration of CNS activities and awareness is called resuscitation.

There are two types of rescue operations performed as part of CPR: actions taken in accordance with the ALS (Advanced Life Support) or BLS (Basic Life Support) algorithm. It is BLS that defines the basic activities that each of us can and should do when providing first aid to both children and adults.

Unfortunately, there are currently no BLS guidelines that can be applied strictly to newborns (only the ALS algorithm for medical staff is available for this age group). According to some specialists, in the event of the need to provide first aid to a newborn in the absence of appropriate medical equipment and by people who have not been trained in this direction, you can apply the BLS guidelines developed for infants, which we will immediately familiarize you with.
 
In the event of sudden cardiac arrest, it is important resuscitation as soon as possible (chest compressions and rescue breaths) because early CPR and correct CPR increase the child's chances of survival.

At the beginning, proceed to assessing the child's condition:

  1. Before taking action, assess safety and put on gloves if possible.
  2. Approach the child and check if he reacts: pat them vigorously on the feet and check the reaction - when there is no reaction, call for help and follow the scheme.
  3. Open the airway by gently tilting the head back: put one hand on the child's forehead, with the other hand lift the chin slightly upwards to the so-called intermediate position or "smell position" (as if the child wanted to smell something above it). Another way to open the airways is to extend the mandible (can be used if you are experienced in performing this type of maneuver).
    The newborn's head, due to its separate anatomy, should not be tilted back too much - remember this!
  4. Assess your breathing on the HEALTHY RESPIRATORY TRACKS. Allow a maximum of 10 seconds for this operation. Put the cheek to the child's mouth, trying to feel or hear it, look carefully to see if the chest rises.

If the child DOES NOT BREATHE - take 5 rescue breaths:

  1. With your lips, try to embrace the area around the mouth and nose of the newborn at the same time and after breathing in, give a gentle breath. Keep an eye on raising your chest - it testifies to the correctness of rescue breaths.
  2. Let your chest fall and then take another breath in the same way.
  3. Take 5 rescue breaths in total, then proceed.

If it still shows no signs of life - start resuscitation:
Chest compressions:

  1. Place the child on a hard surface and proceed to compressing the chest. Place the index and middle finger perpendicularly (2 and 3) to the chest in the lower part of the sternum on the line between the nipples. Place your other hand on the child's head for stabilization.
  2. Lean over the child and press the chest perpendicularly to a depth of 1/3 of its thickness (about 4 cm) with a frequency of 100-120 / min allowing the chest to expand. Do 15 PRESSES this way.

Rescue breaths:

  1. With your lips, try to embrace the area around the mouth and nose of the newborn at the same time and after breathing in, give a gentle breath. Keep an eye on raising your chest - it testifies to the correctness of rescue breaths.
  2. Let the chest fall, then do the second rescue breath in the same way.
  3. After breathing, immediately return to your chest compressions.

If during the rescue breaths the child's chest does not rise - try to open the airway again and repeat the breaths, then immediately return to chest compressions.

After 1 minute of CPR, call the emergency number 112 and follow the dispatcher's instructions.

The above resuscitation activities in diagram 15 PRESSURE: 2 INSPIRATIONS (in the presence of two persons providing help, one of them compresses the chest and the other performs rescue breaths) perform until the arrival of rescuers, improvement of the child's condition (return of breath, crying), exhaustion of strength, security threats.

Every citizen should feel that the injured person is being given basic medical assistance, regardless of whether it is an adult or a child. Studies have shown that people who know BLS algorithms and participate in first aid courses provide it much more willingly and confidently than other people. Therefore, we encourage you to familiarize yourself with the principles of first aid and rehearse them or take part in training, because thanks to this action you may someday be able to save someone's life.